Symptoms Most People Related with IBS and Back Pain

By: Researcher Taymur

Often people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) experience symptoms that seem to be unrelated to IBS. One frequently mentioned and apparently unrelated symptom, particularly during the night, is lower back pain.

This may be incidental pain, or it may be “referred pain.” Referred pain is felt somewhere other than where it comes from. This pain comes from the gut in the case of IBS. It is often caused by constipation, smoke, or bloating.

Understanding IBS Pain Treatment

There is no single, definitive IBS treatment or pain associated with IBS. For everyone, treatment is different, and you should work with your doctor or gastroenterologist to find the best way to relieve pain. A combination of medication and complementary therapies will probably be required.

In the meantime, medications that relieve constipation and gas may reduce back pain. It has also been shown that some probiotics alleviate bloating and pain. Probiotics can be found in powders, tablets, and certain foods such as yogurt.

Check with your doctor before adding supplements to your daily routine over – the-counter. Some supplements can make things worse while others may interfere with other medications.

Specific therapies that can relieve the suffering include:

Relaxation Techniques:

Deep breathing, abdominal breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and exercises of visualization can help to reduce stress and fatigue and improve your mood.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy:

Some studies show that this can help change moods and habits that are negative. It can also reduce stress and relieve physical symptoms.

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Acupuncture:

This can be used to relieve spasms of the muscle, which can ease back pain.

Meditation and Hypnotherapy:

Any of these practices can help your muscles to relax and reduce pain.

Regular Exercise:

Methods like Tai Chi and yoga can help with lower back pain.

Back Pain and Sleep:

In particular, lower back pain can be problematic when you try to sleep. By creating a routine, you can improve your chances of having a good night’s rest.

Follow these tips to get started:

  • Build up before going to bed in a relaxing time. After being active, don’t go to bed. 
  • Do not eat heavy food or drink caffeine for at least four hours before going to bed.
  • Go to bed at about the same time every night and get up every morning at the same time.
  • Two items just use your bed: sleep and sex. That doesn’t mean to work, eat food or watch television in bed.
  • Get a little daily exercise.
  • You can train your body to be more receptive to sleep by having a sleeping routine.

When, despite your best efforts, your back pain keeps you sleeping, talk to your doctor about medications and other therapies that may help.

Giving’s

If you and your IBS have back pain, don’t assume they’re related. Make an appointment for your physician to assess your back pain. You’ll want to know exactly what you’re dealing with and available treatment services.

Resources

aboutibs.org/site/about-ibs/symptoms/sleep

jpain.org/article/S1526-5900%2809%2900413-1/abstract

aboutibs.org/site/about-ibs/management/pain

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